Day 5:Tasman National Park

We headed back east, then south through a series of narrow straits with fascinating names (Denison Canal, Eaglehawk Neck) and into the blob of land tenuously hanging onto the lower right hand side of Tasmania. The Tasman National park is most often photographed from the sea because of its (apparently) stunning cliffs. We had to be happy with the land aspect of it. There’s several stops as the park is spread out into roughly 4 separate sites.

First we got to see the Tesselated pavement, which was amazing. Years of weathering and erosion combined with salt deposition by the sea cause this cracked, ’tiled’ appearance.

We then saw the Devil’s Kitchen, Tasman Blowhole and Tasman Arch (pics to follow soon), which are all rock formations caused by the ocean’s action over many centuries. I have to admit, I found Doo Town more interesting than the rocks! It was a little town where everything, every house, every shop, was named Doo-something, as a continued tradition from one of the town’s founders.

(I had a crayfish roll.It was truly doo-liscious!)

We got to the Lime Bay campsite, on the north west corner of the peninsula early in the afternoon and decided to relax there the rest of the day. Beautiful site, on a great curve of sand that looks out onto a sheltered bay that is only thigh deep 2km out. Fishermen were having to anchor their boats way out in the deeper water, and wade,kayak or swim to and from them. The bay was full of crabs and birdlife, including this bizarre family of black swans merrily floating amidst all the seabirds.

All in all it was a lovely relaxing camp that night, in preparation for the mad rush of a day that was to come.

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